PG Wodehouse: the course of love

“I wish I had a quid for every girl Freddie Widgeon has loved and lost,” sighed an Egg wistfully. “If I had, I shouldn’t be touching you for a fiver.” Continue reading PG Wodehouse: the course of love

Rate this:

Wodehouse Pick-Me-Ups – which stories would be in your collection?

The P G Wodehouse Society (UK) wants to know which three short stories you would include in a Wodehouse Pick-Me-Up edition.  In the latest edition of Wooster Sauce, Quarterly Journal of The P G Wodehouse Society (UK), the Society is offering members who answer this question the chance to win copies of Random House’s new ‘Pick-Me-Up’ editions. For anyone not already ‘in the know’, the article describes this collection as follows: Punningly termed ‘pick-me-up’s’ to reflect both their expected sales position near the tills and the expressed belief that Wodehouse writing offers a pick-me-up for any reader, no matter what … Continue reading Wodehouse Pick-Me-Ups – which stories would be in your collection?

Rate this:

Three Unconventional Roads To Wodehouse

Originally posted on Classically Educated:
Mention PG Wodehouse in a conversation and most people will immediately think of Jeeves and Wooster.  That’s partly due to the success of the books and stories, but, I suspect, mostly because of the various film and TV adaptations.  Of course, the one with Hugh Laurie as Wooster utterly deserves to have that notoriety. But there is more to Wodehouse than the butler and his hapless gentleman.  No less a writer (and polymath) than Isaac Asimov said that Wodehouse, on a sentence level, is one of the three greatest writers in the English language (the… Continue reading Three Unconventional Roads To Wodehouse

Rate this:

P.G. Wodehouse reading guide

So you’d like to give P.G. Wodehouse a try, but don’t know where to start. Or perhaps you’ve read the Jeeves stories and want to explore Wodehouse’s wonderful wider world. 

You’ve come to the right place. Continue reading P.G. Wodehouse reading guide

Rate this:

Highballs for breakfast, lunch and dinner: the prizegiving

This is one prize giving ceremony that cannot be undertaken on orange juice alone. The Cheapest White on the List sat alone at a corner table, solemnly pawing an Anglers’ Rest bar menu. ‘What’s the matter with him? asked The Dubonnet Queen of Ealing Common. ‘The price of Pinot Grigio has gone up’ said a Totally Roasted, discreetly. ‘He’s had to switch to a Chardonnay from South Eastern Australia.” ‘But Australian wine is supposed to be quite good,’ replied The Dubonnet Queen. ‘Not this one,’ said The Cheapest White on the List. ‘I’ve got a nephew in Australia,’ said a … Continue reading Highballs for breakfast, lunch and dinner: the prizegiving

Rate this:

Highballs for Breakfast

Highballs for Breakfast is a new compilation of P.G. Wodehouse’s writing on the subject of liquor, drinking, Dutch Courage and mornings after, compiled and edited by Richard T. Kelly. It’s a well-researched collection that delves widely into the Wodehouse canon, … Continue reading Highballs for Breakfast

Rate this:

Win a copy of new Wodehouse release, ‘Highballs for Breakfast’

There are moments when one needs a drink. Are there moments, indeed, when one doesn’t?’ Barmy in Wonderland (1952) I’m excited to offer Plumtopia readers the chance to win a copy of the new PG Wodehouse release, Highballs for Breakfast, courtesy of Penguin Random House. To enter, simply reply by comment to this post telling us what drink would you be known by at the Anglers’ Rest. Mr Mulliner, one of PG Wodehouse’s beloved narrators, recounted around forty stories from the bar-parlour of the Anglers’ Rest, where inmates are referred to by their drink, rather than by name. From the … Continue reading Win a copy of new Wodehouse release, ‘Highballs for Breakfast’

Rate this:

The birth of P.G. Wodehouse and Sherlock Holmes

PGW quoted this famous character from his third book up to his ninety-third and had a tremendous admiration for Arthur Conan Doyle. N.T.P. Murphy, A Wodehouse Handbook On the 15th of October, 1881, P.G. Wodehouse was born in Guildford , England. Coincidentally, 1881 was also the year in which Dr. John Watson first met Sherlock Holmes. Their meeting was recounted by Arthur Conan Doyle in the first Sherlock Holmes story, A Study in Scarlet (1887). Some years later, the young Wodehouse became an avid reader of these stories, and his early work is littered with Holmesian references.  In The Adventure … Continue reading The birth of P.G. Wodehouse and Sherlock Holmes

Rate this:

I have dyspepsia!

Yesterday I received the Doctor’s diagnosis of an ailment that has been troubling me for some time. I have dyspepsia! I don’t suppose a doctor ever received such a joyous response to this news as mine did. I practically whooped around the surgery. For now, I can read my favourite poem, by Lancelot Mulliner in ‘Came the Dawn’, with the added poignancy of personal suffering. DARKLING (A Threnody) By L. BASSINGTON MULLINER (Copyright in all languages, including the Scandinavian) Black branches, Like a corpse’s withered hands, Waving against the blacker sky: Chill winds, Bitter like the tang of half-remembered sins; … Continue reading I have dyspepsia!

Rate this: