The romances of Bingo Little: Charlotte Corday Rowbotham (by Ken Clevenger)

‘Oh, Great Scott!’ I said. ‘Don’t tell me you’re in love again.’ He seemed aggrieved. ‘What do you mean– again?’ ‘Well, to my certain knowledge you’ve been in love with at least half a dozen girls since the spring, and it’s only July now. There was that waitress and Honoria Glossop and–‘ ‘Oh, tush! Not to say pish! Those girls? Mere passing fancies. This is the real thing.’ ‘Where did you meet her?’ ‘On top of a bus. Her name is Charlotte Corday Rowbotham. ‘ ‘My God!’ ‘It’s not her fault, poor child. Her father had her christened that because … Continue reading The romances of Bingo Little: Charlotte Corday Rowbotham (by Ken Clevenger)

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The romances of Bingo Little: Honoria Glossop

‘The only one of the family I really know is the girl.’ I had hardly spoken these words when the most extraordinary change came over young Bingo’s face. His eyes bulged, his cheeks flushed, and his Adam’s apple hopped about like one of those india-rubber balls on the top of the fountain in a shooting gallery. ‘Oh, Bertie!’ he said, in a strangled sort of voice. I looked at the poor fish anxiously. I knew that he was always falling in love with someone, but it didn’t seem possible that even he could have fallen in love with Honoria Glossop. … Continue reading The romances of Bingo Little: Honoria Glossop

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The Romances of Bingo Little: Mabel

I confess I have a soft spot for the romantic Bingo Little. When we first meet him in The Inimitable Jeeves,¬† Bertie¬†warns us about his habit of falling in love. Ever since I have known him – and we were at school together – he has been perpetually falling in love with someone, generally in the spring, which seems to act on him like magic. At school he had the finest collection of actresses’ photographs of anyone of his time; and at Oxford his romantic nature was a byword. The first of Bingo’s romances to be chronicled by Bertram Wooster … Continue reading The Romances of Bingo Little: Mabel

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The Inimitable Jeeves (1923)

I’m not much of a ladies’ man, but on this particular morning it seemed to me that what I really wanted was some charming girl to buzz up and ask me to save her from assassins or something. So that it was a bit of an anti-climax when I merely ran into young Bingo Little, looking perfectly foul in a crimson satin tie decorated with horseshoes. The Inimitable Jeeves is a great place for new Wodehouse readers to discover Wodehouse’s best known characters, Bertie Wooster and his valet (or gentleman’s gentleman) Jeeves. Although it doesn’t include the first Jeeves and … Continue reading The Inimitable Jeeves (1923)

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