P.G. Wodehouse Reference Guide for Political Commentary

The name P.G. Wodehouse is seeing a resurgence in the somewhat unlikely arena of online political commentary, particularly in Britain.  This puts some people — those who’ve never read any Wodehouse, but seem determined to lug him into the row … Continue reading P.G. Wodehouse Reference Guide for Political Commentary

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P.G. Wodehouse reading list: the Jeeves and Wooster stories

This second article in my reading guide for new Wodehouse readers offers a reading list for the Jeeves and Wooster stories. Jeeves and Wooster Reading List The Inimitable Jeeves (1923)* Carry On, Jeeves (1925)* Very Good Jeeves (1930)* Right Ho, Jeeves (1934; US title Brinkley Manor) The Code of the Woosters (1938) Joy in the Morning (1946) The Mating Season (1949) Jeeves and the Feudal Spirit (1955; US title Bertie Wooster Sees it Through) Jeeves in the Offing (1960; US title How Right You Are, Jeeves) Thank You, Jeeves (1934) Stiff Upper Lip, Jeeves (1963) Much Obliged, Jeeves (1971; US … Continue reading P.G. Wodehouse reading list: the Jeeves and Wooster stories

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The Code of the Woosters: PG Wodehouse’s guide to fighting fascism (The Guardian)

This article by Sam Jordison appeared online at The Guardian today: The Code of the Woosters: PG Wodehouse’s guide to fighting fascism | Books | The Guardian In many respects it’s a welcome move in the right direction, away from the usual misinformation and conjecture about Wodehouse’s wartime experience. Sam Jordison is right to point out that Wodehouse made fun of the British fascist Oswald Mosley in The Code of the Woosters (1938): The trouble with you, Spode, is that just because you have succeeded in inducing a handful of half-wits to disfigure the London scene by going about in black shorts, … Continue reading The Code of the Woosters: PG Wodehouse’s guide to fighting fascism (The Guardian)

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Highballs for breakfast, lunch and dinner: the prizegiving

This is one prize giving ceremony that cannot be undertaken on orange juice alone. The Cheapest White on the List sat alone at a corner table, solemnly pawing an Anglers’ Rest bar menu. ‘What’s the matter with him? asked The Dubonnet Queen of Ealing Common. ‘The price of Pinot Grigio has gone up’ said a Totally Roasted, discreetly. ‘He’s had to switch to a Chardonnay from South Eastern Australia.” ‘But Australian wine is supposed to be quite good,’ replied The Dubonnet Queen. ‘Not this one,’ said The Cheapest White on the List. ‘I’ve got a nephew in Australia,’ said a … Continue reading Highballs for breakfast, lunch and dinner: the prizegiving

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De-codifying the Code of the Woosters

Originally posted on ashokbhatia:
Most of us love Bertram Wilberforce ‘Bertie’ Wooster. Unlike some goofy female characters who would not mind taking ‘a whack at the Wooster millions’, we do not love him for his money. We love him for his self-less attitude and simplicity. Some of us pity him for being ‘mentally negligible’. His tendency to keep getting into one soup or the other often makes us feel superior to him. Whenever he gets stuck, Jeeves rallies around. He keeps pulling him and his pals out of the kind of predicaments they keep facing from time to time. If… Continue reading De-codifying the Code of the Woosters

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Eating like P. G. Wodehouse – the ultimate Anatole menu from The Code of the Woosters

Originally posted on Moulders Lane:
After an amusing discussion at Baker’s Daughter blog on food in books and eating the Enid Blyton way, and a prompt from that witty Wodehouse fan the Old Reliable Ashokbhatia, I have polished up my A level French and scoured the internet to bring you this Wodehousian feast. Aficianados will recall it is the menu put together by Bertie in The Code of the Woosters after he anticipates being jugged in lieu of Aunt Dahlia: ‘Bertie! Do you mean this?’ ‘I should say so. What’s a mere thirty days in the second division? A bagatelle.… Continue reading Eating like P. G. Wodehouse – the ultimate Anatole menu from The Code of the Woosters

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Perfect Nonsense

In December, I had the delightful privilege of seeing Perfect Nonsense on tour at the Theatre Royal in Bath. For anyone not already aware, Perfect Nonsense is a stage adaptation (by David and Robert Goodale) of The Code of the Woosters. It’s been well received by West End audiences since opening in 2013, and is now touring the UK until mid-2015 (see the official site for details). If you’re planning to see the show and don’t want to read my review, look away now.   The Goodale brothers’ clever adaptation sticks closely to Wodehouse’s original story and delicious dialogue, ensuring a … Continue reading Perfect Nonsense

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